The £45 Billion Opportunity

Recently published analysis by Deloitte found that poor mental health costs UK businesses up to £45 billion each year – a rise of 16% since 2016. Rob Stephenson, Founder of InsideOut is a campaigner for creating healthier workplaces. Rob describes mental health as one of the big challenges of our lifetime. So how do we capitalise on this £45 billion opportunity? And what is the role of the board and the executive committee in really pushing the mental health agenda forwards? To explore these questions, InsideOut partnered with Savannah Group for an event hosted at KPMG to bring a room of senior executives together to educate and inspire about the opportunities addressing mental health in the workplace can bring.

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Report: Closing the Innovation Gap

Despite the accelerating pace of technology developments and the exploding number of digital natives emerging in virtually every sector, large incumbents appear to be slow in responding to such existential threats. Digital leaders such as CIOs, CTOs and CDOs are making every effort to mobilise innovation initiatives within their respective organisations. Equally, the CEO community is under increasing pressure to demonstrate how it can generate billions of dollars of new value through genuinely innovative activities. Despite these valiant efforts, the FTSE100 in the UK remains at similar levels to 1999.

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Report: Transforming for Tomorrow

Digital disruption doesn't respect industry boundaries. As incumbents dabble with digital, bolder players are seizing their chance to dominate a new, technology-driven world. The only way to compete is to embrace digital at the core of your organisation and adopt a digital mindset to transform for tomorrow. Savannah Group in partnership with PA Consulting and Prof. Venkat Venkatraman from Boston University have collaborated on a research study and report, collecting views and opinions from over 400 senior executives on the current state of their organisation's digital transformation and how to achieve competitive advantage.

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No Business Shrinks to Greatness – What CEOs in Industrial are Focusing on in 2020.

The differing pressures of ESG agendas, political emission, stakeholder activism, digital take up, decarbonisation and inclusion means that CEO’s of today must tread carefully. With corporate reputation now accounting for at least 25% of a company’s market value, 2020 will be a pivotal year driven by geopolitical agendas which are shaking up markets across the world. So what are CEOs within the industrial sector looking to focus on in 2020?

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Report: Q3 Board Appointments 2019

The average age of the non-executive directors governing the FTSE 350 companies is 59. None of them is below the age of 30 and only a handful are even in their 30s, primarily the nonindependent shareholder appointees. For the purposes of this discussion we are excluding 29 year old Cally Price who is an employee/workforce representative appointed to the Sports Direct board (more on this later). The absolute age range is 32 – 84. No one will be surprised to learn that 84% of those non-executive directors are aged between 50 and 70. One hundred and twenty-eight of them are in their 70s and six are in their 80s. The female NED’s average 57 years and the males 60.

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Report: Q2 Board Appointments 2019

This report reviews the FTSE 350 board appointments in the second quarter, April – June 2019 and follows our reports for the full year 2018 and Q1 2019. We again analyse the non-executive and executive director appointments to the FTSE 350 companies and explore the trends. The FTSE 100 appointments in Q2 show a particularly interesting change in direction with, on the one hand, only 28% of the non-executive appointments being women and, on the other, 100% of the executive director appointments being women.

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Is There A Place for Narcissistic Leaders?

Without restraining anchors, narcissists believe they’re invincible, listening less to words of caution and advice. Rather than trying to persuade those who disagree with him/her, they feel justified in ignoring others, creating further isolation – abrasive with employees who doubt them or with subordinates who are tough enough to fight back. As the more independent-minded team members leave or are pushed out, succession becomes a potential problem. Narcissists ultimately don’t want to change – and if they’re successful, they don’t think they have to.

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Report: Q1 Board Appointments 2019

This first report for 2019 follows our analysis of the FTSE 350 board appointments in 2018 which we published in February. In that report, we pointed to a huge gap in the gender diversity achievements at the executive director level. We showed clearly that women now have more say in governance of the largest companies, but men still dominate the execution. That has not changed so far in 2019, and we didn’t expect that it would.

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The Value of Humble Leadership

Humility and vulnerability in leadership seems to be the latest badge of virtue for those in positions of power. Sometimes packaged as servant, supportive or vulnerable leadership, humble leadership has been around as an idea since the 1970s. But is humble leadership practical in reality?

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A Survival Guide For The Modern CEO

The job of CEOs (or Chairman) is unique and becoming even more challenging. This was discussed at our latest Boardroom Lunch for Chairmen, CEOs and Investors across the Leisure & Hospitality sector. It’s clear there are great potential upsides to being a CEO, it was also interesting that a high proportion of CEO’s commented that the role differed to what they had perhaps expected...

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